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The drive from San Francisco to Sequoia / Kings Canyon was largely boring. Our route took us very close to Los Angeles, and right thru the City of San Bernadino. We are not fond of Southern California traffic. 12 or more lanes going nowhere fast. Once we got off of the Interstate the view and traffic improved ten fold. We spent an hour or so driving thru fields filled with Citrus trees: Pomegranate, Oranges, Lemons, Limes etc.,….  It all looked very delicious, and it tasted amazing. Try Cara Cara oranges if you get the chance, so sweet.

The effects of the drought was also visible, we saw regular signs on the road saying thinks such as “Pray for Rain”, “No Water, No Jobs”.

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The road up to Kings Canyon was pretty extreme, keep it mind the temperature was about 30 C all day.

Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks are right next to each other and are jointly managed. This is one of the most confusing areas laws wise we have visited. National Parks in the United States are impeccable, and we have never found an issue with anyone of them. Around this area, there are 2 National Parks, 2 National Monuments, National Forests, Bureau of Land Management Land, etc. The rules in each area are different, for example you can only camp / sleep in Campgrounds in National Parks, but if you drive down the road into a National Forest, or a National Monument, you can sleep anywhere, as long as there is no sign at that exact location prohibiting it.

Finally made it.

Finally made it.

found this monster on the start of the "Stumps Trail"

found this monster on the start of the “Stumps Trail”

Similar to the Redwoods we covered a few posts ago, Sequoia’s are also massive trees. Redwoods grow taller, but Sequoia’s grow much thicker.

A fallen giant, probably cut 150 years ago.

A fallen giant, probably cut 150 years ago.

this stump was called "Shattered Glass"

this stump was called “Shattered Glass”

As Darkness was just about upon us, we cooked dinner inside the park and then drove 15 minutes to the National Forest, and went to bed. We parked at a popular view point, but we could not see the view as it was pitch black. This would provide an amazing view when we woke up!

Good Morning!

Good Morning!

one of the quietest nights we have had ... ever.

one of the quietest nights we have had … ever.

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Next it was off to see the General Grant Tree. There are three “biggest” trees in these two parks. Two are accessible within a mile of so of the road. The other is not really accessible. The General Grant is the tallest, but not the thickest, General Sherman takes that award in Sequoia National Park.

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The "Fallen Monarch"

The “Fallen Monarch”

Fallen Monarch

Fallen Monarch

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Interesting that they lived in the fallen tree before building this cabin.

Interesting that they lived in the fallen tree before building this cabin.

And we finally reached the General Grant. These trees are so big, they are hard to photograph.

And we finally reached the General Grant. These trees are so big, they are hard to photograph.

On the way out there was another massive stump with this sign beside it.

On the way out there was another massive stump with this sign beside it.

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Now into Sequoia.

Now into Sequoia.

And off to see the General Sherman Tree. The thickest tree in the world.

And off to see the General Sherman Tree. The thickest tree in the world.

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A branch of the Sherman that fell and crushed the concrete pathway beside the tree.

A branch of the Sherman that fell and crushed the concrete pathway beside the tree. Yes! this is just one branch.

These trees are now protected and you cannot cut them. This cross section was cut probably in the late 1800's

These trees are now protected and you cannot cut them. This cross section was cut probably in the late 1800’s

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Time to head south, we had been warned about the south road out of the park. We took it very slow. I have driven a lot of roads in my time, and this one probably takes the award for the tightest corners. All at about a 13 percent grade.

The south road out of the park is extreme

The south road out of the park is extreme

Roads built around trees

Roads built around trees

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This is what to road looks like,

This is what to road looks like,

This is what the GPS looks like

This is what the GPS looks like

We made it out Alive!