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The Cape Breton Highlands are home to a very large Scottish Canadian population, so much so that most road signs have English and Gaelic on them. So naturally the first stop was at a Single Malt Whiskey Distillery.

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We skipped the tours and invested in a taste of the 19 year old Cask strength Single Malt

We skipped the tours and invested in a taste of the 19 year old Cask strength Single Malt. At 60% it was very smooth.

Most of our stops are courtesy of Ann at the Canso Nova Scotia Tourism office. She was amazing! and we loved the Scottish accent. Ann also gave us a line on a few lobster joints on our travels.

The first was the Lobster Pound in Belle-Cote. We arrived and the store was closed, no operating hours were posted on the door or anything. But there was a beautiful beach across the road.

Anyone who swims here needs a head examination.

Anyone who swims here needs a head examination.

nice moves Aya

nice moves Aya

After a few hours lollygagging around the beach, and diverting some streams!  ohh to be a child again, we meandered back up to the car. To our amazement the Lobster Pound was now open.

We will take that one.

We will take that one.

With our live Lobster on ice, we drove up to the Campground at Cape Breton Highlands National Park to cook dinner.

giving him some entertainment while the water comes to a boil.

giving him some entertainment while the water comes to a boil.

And yes those pinchers are pretty strong.

And yes those pinchers are pretty strong.

I think he enjoyed his final few minutes with us, and we promised we would enjoy him for dinner.

Ciao

Ciao

After we arose from our lobster induced Coma, we ventured into the Park.

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Cape Breton Highlands has picture perfect views wherever you look. As the name suggests- Highlands- we are high up, and there is nothing beyond the beaches but ocean. The view stretches out forever, and you can easily lose an hour sitting and watching the ocean.

We checked out the Skyline Trail first as the views here are supposed to be some of the best in the Park.

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Skyline Trail boardwalk.

Skyline Trail boardwalk.

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Top of Skyline Trail

Top of Skyline Trail

Aya Commandeering some wood

Aya Commandeering some wood left behind at the Cheticamp Campground.

We ventured out at Sunset to try and find some Moose. No luck with the moose, but we did see a nice sunset.

We ventured out at dusk to try and find some Moose. No luck with the moose, but we did see a nice sunset.

The next day we awoke to torrential rains. We relocated camp up to South Harbour and headed for Meat Cove. Meat Cove is the most northern community of Nova Scotia. It is a tiny fishing village with maybe 50 residents, it is accessed by a 1.5 lane gravel road. There was not much to see, but that is the beauty here. After leaving Meat Cove, we went into the marginally bigger community of Bay Saint Lawrence.

Bay Saint Lawrence

Bay Saint Lawrence

The only restaurant in town that was open serves a mighty tasty Seafood Chowder, located at the Community Hall.

I am sure there is a juicy story behind the naming of this boat.

I am sure there is a juicy story behind the naming of the middle boat. “Government Slave “

The next day the rains were easily forgotten by the topaz blue sky that met us.

Spectacular colors.

Spectacular colors.

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We stopped to check out the St. Mary’s Waterfall

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We finished off our time in the National Park by a visit to Ingonish Beach.

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