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Terra Nova is a special place- you notice this very quickly from the 50 foot tall Ochre Hill Fire Tower. Well maybe only 45 feet because the actual fire gondola is blocked off.

We checked out the tower on a rather windy day, and the tower does move quite a bit, so if you are afraid of heights this place is probably not for you.

Not sure if this tower is still used or not. In most areas Helicopters have taken over this task.

Not sure if this tower is still used or not. In most areas Helicopters have taken over this task.

We all know what a Fire Tower’s purpose is? Well if not here is a little explaining for you. The name Fire Tower really gives it away. Constructed in areas with an expansive view, some unlucky soul is somehow selected to spend a shift in a tiny gondola, with a set of binoculars and a radio. If they see smoke, they call in the Calvary. Some of the more remote fire towers may be a summer long posting- sounds like fun if you like isolation.

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360 degrees view of Nature, forests, lakes and the sun setting on Newfoundland.

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not a bad sunset.

not a bad sunset.

In our opinion this tower is the highlight of Terra Nova. The view is second to none.

Next up we walked part of the Outport Trail, which connects to the Campground Trail. We were lucky enough to not see anyone else on our journey which is nice. A crowded trail ruins the atmosphere rather quickly.

Outport Trail suspension bridge.

Outport Trail suspension bridge.

Beavers are hard at work fighting the River for control of the water flow.

A fair size beaver dam

A fair size beaver dam

Although we did see some Beaver’s (Canada’s National Animal) swimming around, they were all Camera Shy.

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Further on down the trail we spotted some cool purple pine cones. I think this is a Spruce tree. Someone correct me if this is incorrect.

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Dozens of trees felled by the river

Dozens of trees felled by the river

Beaver house

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We tried to wait these Beavers out and see if anyone came or went. The entrance was underwater, but no luck.

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ohhh just about the sign!

ohhh just about forgot the sign!

Sadly our time in Newfoundland was coming to an end, we had to cover some ground back to the Ferry in Port aux Basques. But an 800 KM drive needs a few stops along the way.

As an example of true Newfoundland hospitality, the welder who repaired our trailer, insisted that we stop in Grand Falls- Windsor and check out the Salmonid Interpretation Centre.

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A natural occurring waterfall at this spot had always been a barrier for Atlantic Salmon coming up stream to spawn. A Hydro Electric dam further restricted Salmon, as a result only 10 percent of the Exploits River was accessible.

A Fish ladder changed all of that.

Fish Ladder

Fish Ladder

The coolest part of this attraction- the Interpretation Centre includes underwater windows to see the fish swimming up the ladder.

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Unlike Pacific Salmon who spawn once and die, Atlantic Salmon can spawn many times over the course of many years.

That’s it Newfoundland- we really enjoyed meeting your people, tasting your food, viewing your stunning province and listening to your music.  And the Icebergs were a welcome bonus.

 

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View from Wreckhouse in Port Aux Basques. The sometimes disputed second windiest area in the world.

Dere goes, Cocky!   (Goodbye in Newfie)